Some may think that Ryan Seacrest is a little bit of a megalomaniac. I think he’s just a smart business man (and maybe a workaholic). Back when American Idol first launched, Ryan was practically an unknown face. Now, you can’t watch TV without seeing his face and catching his name rolling in the credits as an executive producer. Oh ya, did I mention he also has a weekday morning radio show and co-hosts E! News. The man must never sleep.

In the January 16 issue of Fortune magazine, Ryan talks about the future according to him. According to Keffrey Katzenberg, CEO of Dreamworks Animation, Seacrest is single-handedly one of the hardest working men in Hollywood. You can’t argue with that statement. Seacrest’s production company RSP plus his $14 million a season gig with American Idol have given Seacrest quite the profile. And as many believe, he is being positioned to become Matt Lauer’s future replacement on TODAY which would make Ryan even more of an international icon.

At 37-years-old, Ryan is just getting started. Bob Pittman, CEO of Clear Channel sees Seacrest as entertaining and engaging, but at the same time he understands how you can build a show around a brand or please an advertiser.” That delivery of a brand is what has made Ryan the success is he today and it looks like there is no stopping him now. So what can expect for the future of television? You can expect more reality television according to him.

Ryan tells Fortune, “As much as we all talk about the future and how so many things are merging, there is a simplicity that is crucial.” So are The Kardashians the simplistic approach to a complicated media platform? There is no doubt that Ryan has a handle on all forms of media – radio, television, internet and beyond. And, with the advancement of internet connected devices, there is only more outreach for the type of programming and branding he churns out on a daily to yearly basis.

Aside from the Kardashian shows he produces, Seacrest also had a hand in Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution. “We’ll see much more focus on healthy eating in schools and hospitals in the year to come, and I want to continue to produce shows that directly effect change,” he tells Fortune. “We’ve gone too long without addressing issues like child obesity, so to be able to tell those stories and help people through television is a powerful thing.”

With all types of platforms converging and merging in the next few years, I think Seacrest has positioned himself nicely to stand atop the mountain of success. “It’s exciting to me. There’s an appetite for more original content than ever, and I have a company that creates content, whether it’s distributed in short form, reality form, live form, or game form.” Is there anything else Ryan would like to accomplish? “I’d like to make time slow down,” he declares. “We’re developing heavily in that category.”