Vancouver’s own club sensation, Peter Breeze, celebrated the launch of his newest music video on Friday night at one of my favourite bars. The video premiered to a full house at 1181 and received an overwhelmingly positive and excited response from the crowd.

For his latest single, LA, Peter again teamed up with Rami Mikhail. The two previously collaborated on the videos Fucktalk (Buy Me a Drink), X-Rated Angel, and Taxi. The video features some stunning shots of the singer covered in blood and wearing outrageous make-up, juxtaposed with some famous paparazzi videos and celebrity sex-tapes. There’s a certain rawness and honesty to this video that is so authentically Peter. I absolutely love it.

Amidst the insane crowd and chaos I got a chance to catch up with Peter and ask him a few questions about the video. Check out the video for LA and his interview below…

Peter Breeze, “LA”

M: Hey Peter, great to see you and congratulations on the new video! You’ve been performing a bunch of out of town shows for summer this year; can you tell us how that went?

P: I love performing out of town; it’s a very different experience than performing in Vancouver. People always seem more excited to see me when I come to their city because they can’t just walk to Davie Street and see me on any given night. I also love it because I get to meet fans before and after my show and that’s always a huge inspiration for me. As an artist it’s easy to fall into a “no one cares what I’m creating” place especially as an independent artist on the rise but every time I perform there is some fabulous group of kids who prove me wrong. They do care, and I love them for that.

M: With your second album being released earlier this year, what took so long for the first video?

P: Initially the first single was going to be New York Fashion Week. We filmed the video and started editing it. I was out of town for a bit and when I got back and watched everything over it just didn’t click with me. The footage was great and it was actually exactly what we planned but it didn’t give me butterflies and at this point I don’t think there is any point in releasing anything that I’m not completely in love with. So I decided to ditch that video and move onto the next single a song called LA, which is a song I am very, very proud of. When we started planning the video for it, I knew I made the right decision. It wasn’t easy because I am not a patient person but now that LA is done I wouldn’t have done it any other way.

M: What made you gravitate towards shooting a video for this song over others on the album?

P: The way it came together, the content, the sound, just everything about LA has been very magical. With Taxi it was such a perfect interpretation of me and what I’m about presented in a very campy way, LA deals with the same topics but in a more mature way. It’s about a relationship with fame. Where taxi celebrated and mocked it LA talks about the dark and very real side about what it means to be obsessed with fame and to have it be your defining characteristic. Someone like Lindsay Loan, who inspired the song, you look at her or Britney in the pink wig era and see how destructive it can be but at the same time they don’t stop. I find that really interesting.

M: Where did you find inspiration for the concept of this video?

P: I wanted to explore the process of a starving artist becoming a superstar and then the deconstruction of what they had become/created. The blood represented me willing to bleed for what I wanted, the over the top hat look was the creation of a superstar out of this world then you see me destroying that, we also tied in a projection video of my favourite paparazzi videos and sex tapes to emphasize the kind of chaos and desperation that comes from that lifestyle. The interview parts at the beginning and the end were inspired by Edie Sedgwick who I think is a prime example of being a victim of her own fame.

M: What was your favourite part about shooting this video?

P: Working with Rami, of Dreaming in the Rain. It was just me and him and the camera the whole time. Every time I do a new video I feel like it gets simpler and simpler because it’s easier to separate wants from needs. We had so much fun. I love him. I think people think a good video requires a lot of money and a lot of people. I feel like we got handed the directions to a secret world of creating a video. Be talented. Be creative. See your vision through at all costs. That’s all you need.

M: I know you’ve been working with relatively the same team for most of your videos so how did you guys plan to differentiate this video from the others?

P: Each video has its own life. It’s all about a strong concept and executing it in the right way. You can work with the most talented people on the planet but if you don’t let your idea breathe and take shape on its own then the video wont be able to stand on its own. It’s like raising a kid, you want to raise it in a way that when it leaves you, you don’t have to worry about it. The reason I work with the same people over and over again is because I work with the best and I don’t really see the purpose of abandoning that.

M: You collaborate a lot with a bunch of local talent and artists such as designers, stylists, filmmakers and musicians, how do you find such interesting and talented people to work with?

P: I have no fucking clue. They universe puts us together. The one thing I will say is that I’m very intuitive and when I meet someone and know there is potential for magic, artistically or otherwise, I dig my claws in and don’t let go.

M: Who is your favourite person that you’ve worked with and why?

P: Oprah, but I can’t talk about that yet.

M: Your most recent, and arguably most successful video to date was the Taxi video. How do you think this compares to that video?

P: Like I said before I like to think each of my videos can stand on their own. Our primary goal when creating them is to make sure we build on what we’ve already released. I want to say our goal is to make each one better than the last but better isn’t the word. It’s vital that we take all that we have created and released and put all that energy into our new projects and then say ok how we can take this to the next level. It’s all about moving up and moving on. When you start comparing you start going in circles and the only time I like to go in circles is on the dance floor.

M: Have you started working on your next video?

P: Yes.

M: What else can we expect to see from Peter Breeze in the future?

P: More of everything.

M: Amazing! Thanks Peter!