Drunk Texting and Drunk Dialing

drunktext

I’m sure everyone has been there. On a drunken emotional and vulnerable night you reach for your phone and start texting people like ex-lovers.  Nowadays communication is so easy and instant that we sometimes don’t think anymore when we send messages or make that call.

Apparently there is an LG phone (LP4100) in Korea that has a built in breathalyzer to prevent drunk dialing. The iPhone has released two apps called The Bad Decision Blocker and Don’t Dial! One app lets you program certain numbers into it and temporarily blocks them for a certain time frame and will be inaccessible until the time is over (hopefully you’ll be sober by then). The other app lets your friend create a password only they would know and can give you when they feel you are sober enough to make the call.

Now if this could only stop us from sleeping with someone we shouldn’t have, saying “I love you” too soon or from cheating this would complete these apps. Or maybe you should look into partying less if this happens to you often.

Another thing I’d really like to see is an “UNSEND” button for text messages or voicemail. I’ve sent text messages and voicemails in the past and have wanted to take them back. Imagine, this would save many people from arguments and misunderstandings. App developers…are you listening?

Have you ever "Drunk Texted/Drunk Dialed" and regretted it the next day?

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Some funny tidbits I’ve collected regarding drunk text & dialing.

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  • mikeb

    My ex did that almost every weekend.
    He’d 3-way with his moronic “friend” from YYC and they’d call people (strangers) dirty names and just nasty stuff and think it was all hilarious.
    I’d go watch tv in the bedroom wanting no part of it.
    He was such a big bird dumbass!

  • LOL Big Bird

  • mikeb

    serious big bird, 6’4″ blonde haired big bird, hehe.

  • Gmail also has a little setting you can turn on that, on certain days and between certain hours that you set, you have to answer a series of math questions before the timer runs out or it won’t allow you to send your email. Thus, hopefully, unless you’re exceptional at basic math while sloshed, you will no longer be able to send drunk emails to exes/friends/bosses etc.

  • Nice one Benjamin…now I wonder if this will work for gmail on the iPhone.

  • Whats wrong with simply maintaining the presence of mind not to send anything embarrassing or rude, or having friends who, when in receipt of such material, are mature enough to account for the circumstances?

    We all, on occasion, do stupid things. Inventing elaborate means of self-censorship, and acting embarrassed afterward merely exacerbates this unfortunate fact of life.

  • that’s pretty naive, artem

  • In an ideal world people would be perfect and will have self control to not do stupid things. Until then apps like these are more useful than harmful.

  • I beg to differ. To me such contrivances are silly, and in fact their use is more embarrassing than the gaffes they are meant to prevent.

    I have a friend who drunk-dials and drunk-texts me on occasion. At one point this occurred with some regularity. However he has the presence of mind and the integrity to call me the next morning and apologize, we laugh it off, no damage done. My respect for him is, indeed, strengthened by the fact that he’s willing to admit to doing something foolish and seek to redress it.

    On the flip side, I know that I’m guilty of leaving at least one drunken voice mail on an ex’s phone. A playwright once observed that only drunks and children tell the truth, and such experiences can lead to growth. Had I been prevented from that voicemail through some technological means (and they haven’t yet designed an app capable of doing so with any degree of success), the content of that voicemail would have simply found some other, possibly even more embarrassing, outlet. As it is, the issues raised were dealt with and my friend and I are closer today than we were back then, as a result.

  • Tamara

    Trust me! Been there done that! There was this one time were I called my ex-boyfriend and I had drank 10 paralyzers I’m sure and I told him I wanted him to fuck me in the ass again like he did on our first year anniversary. Anyways, he hung up on me, but I regret ever making that fucking call.

    xoxoxoxoxoxoxo Tamara

  • I love you Tamara! And go easy on those paralyzers. 🙂

  • Topher: It well may be. However, there is something to be said for the ability to own one’s errors. It’s what the adults do 😉

  • I’m confused. First you state that we all should be able to “maintaining the presence of mind not to send anything embarrassing or rude”, but also, own up to it if we do?

    I would hope that ADULTS are smart enough to know that inebriation puts you in a different state of mind, and it would be responsible to prevent yourself from inappropriate conversations. Just because you own up to it after doesn’t mean the damage isn’t done.

  • The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless yet be determined to make them otherwise.
    — F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The two ideas here aren’t even opposed ;-).

    An adult thing to do would be to prevent oneself from becoming drunk to the point of utter buffoonery (see dictionary for terms such as class, dignity etc). Failing that, having friends who are mature enough to recognize a liqueur-induced gaffe when they are subjected to one helps mitigate the “damage.”

    Unfortunately, it is often the case that the former prerequisites the latter; so, perhaps a technological straighjacket is appropriate in hopeless cases.

  • Well, first of, nice quote. But that’s all it is, not fact. Nice to have such modesty by implying you’re a of a first-rate intelligence.

    You started claiming why you didn’t think these types of applications were necessary, then when Rich commented that he disagreed, you provided a different defense saying that drunk dialing is ok as long as both parties are mature enough to take it as such.

    People aren’t perfect, and maturity has nothing to do with it. “Liqueur-induced gaffe[s]” aren’t always funny, they can hurt feelings and be highly insulting. Especially when they come from someone drunk in both alcohol and emotion. Self-control is something some people have to strive toward, and having a technological safety-net (rather than straight-jacket) is perfectly acceptable.

  • I’m with Topher on this one- I wish I’d had something to stop me from drunk texting, calling and/or emailing 5 years ago when I’d first broken up with my ex. Had there been, it would have saved me from a lot of drama and emotional pain. Obviously much of what can be said during these instances can be based in truth, but- like our bodies- alcohol also alters our emotional state and can blow things out of proportion to such an extent that the actual “truthfulness” of things that are said is questionable, at best.

    Sure there’s the component of being “adult” and taking responsibility, blah blah blah- but if you can prevent the whole situation from happening in the first place (who likes to embarrass themselves?)- why wouldn’t you?

  • What makes a fact, a fact, pray tell? Is there such a thing?

    My modesty may be legendary, but I claim no responsibility for any inferences you choose to draw, however flattering they may be.

    As to your second paragraph. Again, I don’t see those two ideas as being contradictory. Yes, unfortunate lapses in judgment happen often despite the best of safeguards. Why exacerbate them by drawing the wrong lessons for the future? Owning one’s errors can go a long way towards attaining self-respect and (by natural extension) self-control.

    A “technological safety-net,” nifty though it may be, is a little like treating the symptom without addressing the root cause of the illness. Worse still, it’s like admitting defeat in the face of self-imposed limitations.

    Indeed, people aren’t perfect, nor should they be, maturity has everything to do with it 😉

    -Artem
    Obfuscating the obvious since 1981.

  • Kevin:

    I can, of course, see that argument, but break it down to its basics and what we have is this. By limiting one’s ability to communicate at times if distress you seek to eliminate the consequences (drawn from previous experience) without addressing the actions from which those consequences arise. Is that not counter-productive?

    As to your example, you seem to be doing rather well now, and I’d venture to guess that the drama to which you refer occasion some learning and experience along the way that might very well help you now.

    However, if you were prevented from making those errors earlier, and all of a sudden your safeguards were no longer functioning, there would be no reservoir of experience to caution you today. See my point?

  • I do see your point Artem, but still disagree. I would be every bit as great as I am today without having said experiences. Additionally, I think any kind of app that stops people from doing stupid shit is absolutely brilliant- if for no other reason than that it cuts down the drama you have to deal with.

    Now, if only someone would make an app that would stop people of a certain age from dancing shirtless surrounded by 19 year-old boys at the Odyssey…

  • I suppose we’ll have to agree to disagree on this one Kevin – given that technological dependence and personal autonomy are often irreconcilable.

    Here is where I’ll venture to draw an inference of my own: losing one’s shirt at the Odyssey (though hardly a gaffe, for the purposes of the present debate) while surrounded by people of a certain age has lost its luster somewhat, over the years.

    As one ages, I suppose it’s natural that one’s tastes mature as well. This can be said of most people I suppose, with the exception of certain mutual acquaintances of ours 😉

  • Yes, we’ll clearly need to agree to disagree.

  • Kyle

    MY BRAIN IS BIGGER THAN YOUR BRAIN!

    it’s the new version of my dad can beat up your dad.

    drunk texting is one thing, drunk facebooking is entirely another.

    Too many times have i woken up to find angry-at-the-world mean drunk status updates on my profile. whoops.

    http://www.craigslist.org/about/best/ott/363794217.html

  • So true…like drunk texting, I’ve drunk facebooked in the past as well. Guilty! Somehow I tell people I love them…even if I don’t when I’m drunk LOL